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A BRIEF HISTORY OF CUERDEN HALL

The original house on the site, dating from the 17th century, no longer exists although there is evidence of the ground floor within the basements of the existing house. 

The Charnock family of Charnock Richard owned the estates until 1521 when Richard Charnock of Cuerden and Leyland sold his manor to Thomas Langton, the Lord Newton. 

In 1605 Henry Banastre of Bank Hall bought the Cuerden Hall Estate from the Langton Family. Henry's daughter, Alice, wife of Sir Thomas Haggerston Bt, held ownership in 1641.

The present building dates from 1717 and was erected by Banastre Parker, son of Robert Parker, the former High Sheriff of Lancashire from 1710, when he moved the Parker family from Extwistle Hall. Upon his death in 1738 the estate passed to his son Robert Parker (1727–1779) and in turn to his grandchildren Banastre Parker (1758–1788) and Thomas Towneley Parker (1760–1794).

In the years 1816 to 1819 Robert Townley Parker (1793–1879), having inherited the estate from his father, remodelled the Hall according to the designs of Lewis Wyatt. This incorporated a significant extension to the east wing of the property.

After the death of Capt. Robert Townley Parker (1823–1894) and later his brother Thomas Townley Parker (1822–1906) the estate passed to their nephew Reginald Arthur Tatton (1857–1926) who re-designed the gardens, introducing a pergola and gazebo, a walled garden and pond.

During the First World War Tatton adapted the Hall for use as an infirmary for troops, and between 1 May 1915 and 8 June 1917 it was known as Cuerden Hall Auxiliary Hospital.

The drawing rooms, with the Tatton family’s collection of old masters and portraits still adorning the walls, were turned into wards and furnished with beds, bed linen and equipment, whilst the parkland and gardens provided an area for convalescence for the soldiers, enjoying such activities as boating on the lake, haymaking, and picnicking. 

During the Second World War, the estate was requisitioned by the Ministry of Defence and converted into an Army Education Centre. Later, it became the British Army Divisional Headquarters of the Anti-Aircraft Command. 

In 1958, after nearly 250 years of private family ownership, the Hall was finally sold by the Tatton family to the Ministry of Defence and, in 1967, it became the Army's Headquarters North West District.

In 1977 the Central Lancashire Development Corporation took over the Hall from the Ministry of Defence and established its own Headquarters, in the process constructing new offices and car parks in the grounds. 

By 1978, the parkland and wider estate had been developed into Cuerden Valley Park. 

In 1985, the Hall became a Sue Ryder Care Home for patients with neurological conditions. The Hall was sold to the its new owner in 2020.

 

HISTORICAL  RESOURCES

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THE HISTORY & SIGNIFICANCE OF
CUERDEN HALL, 
APRIL 2021

 

THE HISTORY OF CUERDEN HALL

PRE-HISTORIC CUERDEN

ACCOUNTS BOOK 1770

INVENTORY 1779

PRE-19TH CENTURY REPORT

WYATT ESTIMATE

WYATT LETTERS 1816

WYATT LETTERS 1817

WYATT LETTERS 1818

WYATT LETTERS 1819

WYATT LETTERS 1821

WYATT LETTERS 1822

TITHE APPORTIONMENT 1838

PLAN OF THE TOWNSHIP 1839

ORDINANCE SURVEY 1848

LAKE PLAN 1880

BUILDING PHASE PLAN 1717-1908

19TH CENTURY BUILDING COSTS

19TH CENTURY BUILDING COSTS CONTINUED

20TH CENTURY FLOOR PLANS

CUERDEN HALL PRINT

STAG LODGE POSTCODE

COLLECTION OF PHOTOS

SALE AGREEMENT 1952

LEP NEWSPAPER CLIPPING 1977

BUILDING ACCOUNTS EXTRACT

CUERDEN HALL LITHOGRAPH

COLLECTION OF PHOTOS 1985

RESEARCH 2001

 

SHARE YOUR STORIES

We're keen to learn more about the Hall and what it means to you. If you have any historical knowledge, interesting facts, insights, pictures or stories to share, please contact us at enquiries@cuerdenhall.com.


We'll share your stories on our social media pages for everyone to enjoy.

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